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SAFETY DATA

The safety and tolerability profile of OFEV has been demonstrated in 3 clinical trials with over 1000 patients with IPF1

The most common adverse REACTIONS were gastrointestinal in nature and generally of mild or moderate intensity1

Adverse reactions reported in ≥5% of OFEV (nintedanib)–treated patients vs placebo

Most common OFEV adverse reactions Most common OFEV adverse reactions
  • In addition, hypothyroidism was reported in patients treated with OFEV more than placebo (1.1% vs 0.6%)

SYMPTOMATIC TREATMENT, DOSE REDUCTION, TREATMENT INTERRUPTION, AND/OR DISCONTINUATION WERE USED TO MANAGE DIARRHEA IN THE INPULSIS® TRIALS

Diarrhea adverse reaction events statistics Diarrhea adverse reaction events statistics

INPULSIS®-ON, an open-label extension trial, supports the safety and tolerability demonstrated in the INPULSIS® trials3

Objective

  • A single-arm, open-label extension trial of the INPULSIS® trials (INPULSIS®-1 and INPULSIS®-2) designed to assess the long-term safety of OFEV in patients with IPF3

Methods

  • 734 patients who completed the 52-week INPULSIS® trials and follow-up visit enrolled in the extension trial—this included 430 patients who continued treatment on OFEV and 304 patients who were previously taking placebo3
  • The first patient was enrolled in INPULSIS®-ON in July 2012, and the database was locked for final analysis in September 20173
  • At the time of the final 192-week analysis, the median total exposure for patients treated with OFEV during INPULSIS® and INPULSIS®-ON was 44.7 months (11.9-68.3 months)3
    • The median exposure in INPULSIS®-ON for patients initiating OFEV and patients continuing OFEV was 29.4 months and 32.8 months, respectively3
INPULSIS® clinical trial extension eligible patients INPULSIS® clinical trial extension eligible patients

Limitations3,4

  • Based on the open-label design, a potential for bias exists in the group of patients who completed the INPULSIS® trials and continued treatment in INPULSIS®-ON
  • As with other open-label extension trials, data limitations exist due to the absence of a comparator group and the decreasing patient numbers over time
  • Due to the lack of a placebo group, statistical comparisons cannot be made
  • All analyses were descriptive in nature
91% of eligible patients who completed INPULSIS® enrolled in INPULSIS®-ON3†

ADVERSE EVENTS OBSERVED WERE CONSISTENT BETWEEN INPULSIS® AND INPULSIS®-ON3‡

Most frequent adverse events in INPULSIS® and INPULSIS®-ON reported in patient exposure-years3,4

INPULSIS® clinical trial extension adverse events INPULSIS® clinical trial extension adverse events
  • The most frequent adverse events leading to treatment discontinuation in INPULSIS® were diarrhea (4.4%), progression of IPF (2.0%), nausea (2.0%), and decreased appetite (1.4%)4
  • The most frequent adverse events leading to treatment discontinuation in INPULSIS®-ON were progression of IPF (12% of patients continuing OFEV and 14% of patients initiating OFEV), diarrhea (5% of patients continuing OFEV and 10% of patients initiating OFEV), nausea (<1% of patients continuing OFEV and 2% of patients initiating OFEV), and respiratory failure (2% of patients continuing OFEV and 1% of patients initiating OFEV)3

Annual rate of FVC decline observed in the INPULSIS® and INPULSIS®-ON trials3

INPULSIS® clinical trial extension FVC mean change INPULSIS® clinical trial extension FVC mean change
At completion of INPULSIS®-ON, the median total exposure for patients treated with OFEV was 44.7 months (11.9-68.3 months)

FVC, forced vital capacity; IPF, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis; MedDRA, Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities.

*Per protocol, the off-treatment period between INPULSIS® and INPULSIS®-ON could be between 4 and 12 weeks.3

A total of 807 patients completed the planned observation time for INPULSIS® and were eligible for enrollment in INPULSIS®-ON. Of the 807 eligible patients, 734 opted to enroll in INPULSIS®-ON.3

Safety analysis included the treated set from the 52-week INPULSIS® trials and all data collected in INPULSIS®-ON between July 2012 and September 2017.3,4

§Corresponds to MedDRA preferred term “IPF,” which includes disease worsening and acute exacerbations.3

||Only patients who completed INPULSIS® and the follow-up visit were eligible to enroll in INPULSIS®-ON.4

The median exposure in INPULSIS®-ON for patients initiating OFEV and patients continuing OFEV was 29.4 months and 32.8 months, respectively.3

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

INDICATIONS

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

Hepatic Impairment: OFEV is not recommended in patients with moderate (Child Pugh B) or severe (Child Pugh C) hepatic impairment. Patients with mild hepatic impairment (Child Pugh A) can be treated with a reduced dosage (100 mg twice daily). Consider treatment interruption or discontinuation for management of adverse reactions.

INDICATIONS

OFEV is indicated for the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF).

OFEV is indicated to slow the rate of decline in pulmonary function in patients with systemic sclerosis-associated interstitial lung disease (SSc-ILD).

Elevated Liver Enzymes and Drug-Induced Liver Injury

  • Cases of drug-induced liver injury (DILI) have been observed with OFEV treatment. In the clinical trials and post-marketing period, non-serious and serious cases of DILI were reported. Cases of severe liver injury with fatal outcome have been reported in the post-marketing period. The majority of hepatic events occur within the first three months of treatment. OFEV was associated with elevations of liver enzymes (ALT, AST, ALKP, and GGT) and bilirubin. Liver enzyme and bilirubin increases were reversible with dose modification or interruption in the majority of cases.
  • In IPF studies, the majority (94%) of patients with ALT and/or AST elevations had elevations less than 5 times ULN and the majority (95%) of patients with bilirubin elevations had elevations less than 2 times ULN.
  • In the SSc-ILD study, a maximum ALT and/or AST greater than or equal to 3 times ULN was observed in 4.9% of patients treated with OFEV.
  • Patients with low body weight (less than 65 kg), patients who are Asian, and female patients may have a higher risk of elevations in liver enzymes. Nintedanib exposure increased with patient age, which may result in increased liver enzymes.
  • Conduct liver function tests prior to initiation of treatment, at regular intervals during the first three months of treatment, and periodically thereafter or as clinically indicated. Measure liver function tests promptly in patients who report symptoms that may indicate liver injury, including fatigue, anorexia, right upper abdominal discomfort, dark urine, or jaundice. Dosage modifications, interruption, or discontinuation may be necessary for liver enzyme elevations.

Gastrointestinal Disorders

Diarrhea

  • In IPF studies, diarrhea was the most frequent gastrointestinal event reported in 62% versus 18% of patients treated with OFEV and placebo, respectively. Events were primarily mild to moderate in intensity and occurred within the first 3 months. Diarrhea led to permanent dose reduction in 11% and discontinuation in 5% of OFEV patients versus 0 and less than 1% in placebo patients, respectively.
  • In the SSc-ILD study, diarrhea was the most frequent gastrointestinal event reported in 76% versus 32% of patients treated with OFEV and placebo, respectively. Events were primarily mild to moderate in intensity and occurred within the first 3 months. Diarrhea led to permanent dose reduction in 22% and discontinuation in 7% of OFEV patients versus 1% and 0.3% in placebo patients, respectively.
  • Dosage modifications or treatment interruptions may be necessary in patients with diarrhea. Treat diarrhea at first signs with adequate hydration and antidiarrheal medication (e.g., loperamide), and consider treatment interruption if diarrhea continues. OFEV treatment may be resumed at the full dosage (150 mg twice daily), or at the reduced dosage (100 mg twice daily), which subsequently may be increased to the full dosage. If severe diarrhea persists, discontinue treatment.

Nausea and Vomiting

  • In IPF studies, nausea was reported in 24% versus 7% and vomiting was reported in 12% versus 3% of patients treated with OFEV and placebo, respectively. Events were primarily of mild to moderate intensity. Nausea and vomiting led to discontinuation of OFEV in 2% and 1% of patients, respectively.
  • In the SSc-ILD study, nausea was reported in 32% versus 14% and vomiting was reported in 25% versus 10% of patients treated with OFEV and placebo, respectively. Events were primarily of mild to moderate intensity. Nausea and vomiting led to discontinuation of OFEV in 2% and 1% of patients, respectively.
  • If nausea or vomiting persists despite appropriate supportive care including anti-emetic therapy, consider dose reduction or treatment interruption. OFEV treatment may be resumed at full dosage or at reduced dosage, which subsequently may be increased to full dosage. If severe nausea or vomiting does not resolve, discontinue treatment.

Embryofetal Toxicity:

OFEV can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman and patients should be advised of the potential risk to a fetus. Women should be advised to avoid becoming pregnant while receiving OFEV and to use highly effective contraception during treatment and at least 3 months after the last dose of OFEV. As the impact of nintedanib on the effectiveness of hormonal contraception is unknown, advise women using hormonal contraceptives to add a barrier method. Verify pregnancy status prior to starting OFEV and during treatment as appropriate.

Arterial Thromboembolic Events

  • In IPF studies, arterial thromboembolic events were reported in 2.5% of OFEV and 0.8% of placebo patients, respectively. Myocardial infarction was the most common arterial thromboembolic event, occurring in 1.5% of OFEV and 0.4% of placebo patients.
  • In the SSc-ILD study, arterial thromboembolic events were reported in 0.7% of patients in both the OFEV-treated and placebo-treated patients. There were 0 cases of myocardial infarction in OFEV-treated patients compared to 0.7% of placebo-treated patients.
  • Use caution when treating patients at higher cardiovascular risk, including known coronary artery disease. Consider treatment interruption in patients who develop signs or symptoms of acute myocardial ischemia.

Risk of Bleeding

  • OFEV may increase the risk of bleeding.
  • In IPF studies, bleeding events were reported in 10% of OFEV versus 7% of placebo patients. In the post-marketing period, non-serious and serious bleeding events, some of which were fatal, have been observed.
  • In the SSc-ILD study, bleeding events were reported in 11% of OFEV versus 8% of placebo patients.
  • Use OFEV in patients with known risk of bleeding only if the anticipated benefit outweighs the potential risk.

Gastrointestinal Perforation

  • OFEV may increase the risk of gastrointestinal perforation.
  • In IPF studies, gastrointestinal perforation was reported in 0.3% of OFEV versus in 0% placebo patients.
  • In the SSc-ILD study, no cases of gastrointestinal perforation were reported in either OFEV or placebo-treated patients.
  • In the post-marketing period, cases of gastrointestinal perforations have been reported, some of which were fatal. Use caution when treating patients who have had recent abdominal surgery, have a previous history of diverticular disease, or who are receiving concomitant corticosteroids or NSAIDs. Discontinue therapy with OFEV in patients who develop gastrointestinal perforation. Only use OFEV in patients with known risk of gastrointestinal perforation if the anticipated benefit outweighs the potential risk.

ADVERSE REACTIONS

  • Adverse reactions reported in greater than or equal to 5% of OFEV patients, and more than placebo, included diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, skin ulcer, abdominal pain, liver enzyme elevation, weight decreased, fatigue, decreased appetite, headache, pyrexia, back pain, dizziness and hypertension.
  • In IPF studies, the most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in patients treated with OFEV, more than placebo, were bronchitis (1.2% vs. 0.8%) and myocardial infarction (1.5% vs. 0.4%). The most common adverse events leading to death in OFEV patients versus placebo were pneumonia (0.7% vs. 0.6%), lung neoplasm malignant (0.3% vs. 0%), and myocardial infarction (0.3% vs. 0.2%). In the predefined category of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) including MI, fatal events were reported in 0.6% of OFEV versus 1.8% in placebo patients.
  • In the SSc-ILD study, the most frequent serious adverse events reported in patients treated with OFEV, more than placebo, were interstitial lung disease (2.4% vs. 1.7%) and pneumonia (2.8% vs. 0.3%). Within 52 weeks, 5 patients treated with OFEV (1.7%) and 4 patients treated with placebo (1.4%) died. There was no pattern among adverse events leading to death in either treatment arm.

DRUG INTERACTIONS

  • P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and CYP3A4 Inhibitors and Inducers: Coadministration with oral doses of a P-gp and CYP3A4 inhibitor, ketoconazole, increased exposure to nintedanib by 60%. Concomitant use of potent P-gp and CYP3A4 inhibitors (e.g., erythromycin) with OFEV may increase exposure to nintedanib. In such cases, patients should be monitored closely for tolerability of OFEV. Management of adverse reactions may require interruption, dose reduction, or discontinuation of therapy with OFEV. Coadministration with oral doses of a P-gp and CYP3A4 inducer, rifampicin, decreased exposure to nintedanib by 50%. Concomitant use of P-gp and CYP3A4 inducers (e.g., carbamazepine, phenytoin, and St. John’s wort) with OFEV should be avoided as these drugs may decrease exposure to nintedanib.
  • Anticoagulants: Nintedanib may increase the risk of bleeding. Monitor patients on full anticoagulation therapy closely for bleeding and adjust anticoagulation treatment as necessary.

USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

  • Nursing Mothers: Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in nursing infants from OFEV, advise women that breastfeeding is not recommended during treatment.
  • Reproductive Potential: OFEV may reduce fertility in females of reproductive potential.
  • Smokers: Smoking was associated with decreased exposure to OFEV, which may affect the efficacy of OFEV. Encourage patients to stop smoking prior to and during treatment.
CL-OF-100025 09.06.19

Click here for full Prescribing Information, including Patient Information.

References:

  1. OFEV® (nintedanib) Prescribing Information. Ridgefield, CT: Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc; 2019.
  2. Richeldi L et al; for the INPULSIS Trial Investigators. N Engl J Med. 2014;370(22):2071-2082.
  3. Crestani B et al. Lancet Respir Med. 2019;7(1):60-68.
  4. Data on file. Ridgefield, CT: Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

INDICATIONS

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

Hepatic Impairment: OFEV is not recommended in patients with moderate (Child Pugh B) or severe (Child Pugh C) hepatic impairment. Patients with mild hepatic impairment (Child Pugh A) can be treated with a reduced dosage (100 mg twice daily). Consider treatment interruption or discontinuation for management of adverse reactions.

INDICATIONS

OFEV is indicated for the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF).

OFEV is indicated to slow the rate of decline in pulmonary function in patients with systemic sclerosis-associated interstitial lung disease (SSc-ILD).

Elevated Liver Enzymes and Drug-Induced Liver Injury

  • Cases of drug-induced liver injury (DILI) have been observed with OFEV treatment. In the clinical trials and post-marketing period, non-serious and serious cases of DILI were reported. Cases of severe liver injury with fatal outcome have been reported in the post-marketing period. The majority of hepatic events occur within the first three months of treatment. OFEV was associated with elevations of liver enzymes (ALT, AST, ALKP, and GGT) and bilirubin. Liver enzyme and bilirubin increases were reversible with dose modification or interruption in the majority of cases.
  • In IPF studies, the majority (94%) of patients with ALT and/or AST elevations had elevations less than 5 times ULN and the majority (95%) of patients with bilirubin elevations had elevations less than 2 times ULN.
  • In the SSc-ILD study, a maximum ALT and/or AST greater than or equal to 3 times ULN was observed in 4.9% of patients treated with OFEV.
  • Patients with low body weight (less than 65 kg), patients who are Asian, and female patients may have a higher risk of elevations in liver enzymes. Nintedanib exposure increased with patient age, which may result in increased liver enzymes.
  • Conduct liver function tests prior to initiation of treatment, at regular intervals during the first three months of treatment, and periodically thereafter or as clinically indicated. Measure liver function tests promptly in patients who report symptoms that may indicate liver injury, including fatigue, anorexia, right upper abdominal discomfort, dark urine, or jaundice. Dosage modifications, interruption, or discontinuation may be necessary for liver enzyme elevations.

Gastrointestinal Disorders

Diarrhea

  • In IPF studies, diarrhea was the most frequent gastrointestinal event reported in 62% versus 18% of patients treated with OFEV and placebo, respectively. Events were primarily mild to moderate in intensity and occurred within the first 3 months. Diarrhea led to permanent dose reduction in 11% and discontinuation in 5% of OFEV patients versus 0 and less than 1% in placebo patients, respectively.
  • In the SSc-ILD study, diarrhea was the most frequent gastrointestinal event reported in 76% versus 32% of patients treated with OFEV and placebo, respectively. Events were primarily mild to moderate in intensity and occurred within the first 3 months. Diarrhea led to permanent dose reduction in 22% and discontinuation in 7% of OFEV patients versus 1% and 0.3% in placebo patients, respectively.
  • Dosage modifications or treatment interruptions may be necessary in patients with diarrhea. Treat diarrhea at first signs with adequate hydration and antidiarrheal medication (e.g., loperamide), and consider treatment interruption if diarrhea continues. OFEV treatment may be resumed at the full dosage (150 mg twice daily), or at the reduced dosage (100 mg twice daily), which subsequently may be increased to the full dosage. If severe diarrhea persists, discontinue treatment.

Nausea and Vomiting

  • In IPF studies, nausea was reported in 24% versus 7% and vomiting was reported in 12% versus 3% of patients treated with OFEV and placebo, respectively. Events were primarily of mild to moderate intensity. Nausea and vomiting led to discontinuation of OFEV in 2% and 1% of patients, respectively.
  • In the SSc-ILD study, nausea was reported in 32% versus 14% and vomiting was reported in 25% versus 10% of patients treated with OFEV and placebo, respectively. Events were primarily of mild to moderate intensity. Nausea and vomiting led to discontinuation of OFEV in 2% and 1% of patients, respectively.
  • If nausea or vomiting persists despite appropriate supportive care including anti-emetic therapy, consider dose reduction or treatment interruption. OFEV treatment may be resumed at full dosage or at reduced dosage, which subsequently may be increased to full dosage. If severe nausea or vomiting does not resolve, discontinue treatment.

Embryofetal Toxicity:

OFEV can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman and patients should be advised of the potential risk to a fetus. Women should be advised to avoid becoming pregnant while receiving OFEV and to use highly effective contraception during treatment and at least 3 months after the last dose of OFEV. As the impact of nintedanib on the effectiveness of hormonal contraception is unknown, advise women using hormonal contraceptives to add a barrier method. Verify pregnancy status prior to starting OFEV and during treatment as appropriate.

Arterial Thromboembolic Events

  • In IPF studies, arterial thromboembolic events were reported in 2.5% of OFEV and 0.8% of placebo patients, respectively. Myocardial infarction was the most common arterial thromboembolic event, occurring in 1.5% of OFEV and 0.4% of placebo patients.
  • In the SSc-ILD study, arterial thromboembolic events were reported in 0.7% of patients in both the OFEV-treated and placebo-treated patients. There were 0 cases of myocardial infarction in OFEV-treated patients compared to 0.7% of placebo-treated patients.
  • Use caution when treating patients at higher cardiovascular risk, including known coronary artery disease. Consider treatment interruption in patients who develop signs or symptoms of acute myocardial ischemia.

Risk of Bleeding

  • OFEV may increase the risk of bleeding.
  • In IPF studies, bleeding events were reported in 10% of OFEV versus 7% of placebo patients. In the post-marketing period, non-serious and serious bleeding events, some of which were fatal, have been observed.
  • In the SSc-ILD study, bleeding events were reported in 11% of OFEV versus 8% of placebo patients.
  • Use OFEV in patients with known risk of bleeding only if the anticipated benefit outweighs the potential risk.

Gastrointestinal Perforation

  • OFEV may increase the risk of gastrointestinal perforation.
  • In IPF studies, gastrointestinal perforation was reported in 0.3% of OFEV versus in 0% placebo patients.
  • In the SSc-ILD study, no cases of gastrointestinal perforation were reported in either OFEV or placebo-treated patients.
  • In the post-marketing period, cases of gastrointestinal perforations have been reported, some of which were fatal. Use caution when treating patients who have had recent abdominal surgery, have a previous history of diverticular disease, or who are receiving concomitant corticosteroids or NSAIDs. Discontinue therapy with OFEV in patients who develop gastrointestinal perforation. Only use OFEV in patients with known risk of gastrointestinal perforation if the anticipated benefit outweighs the potential risk.

ADVERSE REACTIONS

  • Adverse reactions reported in greater than or equal to 5% of OFEV patients, and more than placebo, included diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, skin ulcer, abdominal pain, liver enzyme elevation, weight decreased, fatigue, decreased appetite, headache, pyrexia, back pain, dizziness and hypertension.
  • In IPF studies, the most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in patients treated with OFEV, more than placebo, were bronchitis (1.2% vs. 0.8%) and myocardial infarction (1.5% vs. 0.4%). The most common adverse events leading to death in OFEV patients versus placebo were pneumonia (0.7% vs. 0.6%), lung neoplasm malignant (0.3% vs. 0%), and myocardial infarction (0.3% vs. 0.2%). In the predefined category of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) including MI, fatal events were reported in 0.6% of OFEV versus 1.8% in placebo patients.
  • In the SSc-ILD study, the most frequent serious adverse events reported in patients treated with OFEV, more than placebo, were interstitial lung disease (2.4% vs. 1.7%) and pneumonia (2.8% vs. 0.3%). Within 52 weeks, 5 patients treated with OFEV (1.7%) and 4 patients treated with placebo (1.4%) died. There was no pattern among adverse events leading to death in either treatment arm.

DRUG INTERACTIONS

  • P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and CYP3A4 Inhibitors and Inducers: Coadministration with oral doses of a P-gp and CYP3A4 inhibitor, ketoconazole, increased exposure to nintedanib by 60%. Concomitant use of potent P-gp and CYP3A4 inhibitors (e.g., erythromycin) with OFEV may increase exposure to nintedanib. In such cases, patients should be monitored closely for tolerability of OFEV. Management of adverse reactions may require interruption, dose reduction, or discontinuation of therapy with OFEV. Coadministration with oral doses of a P-gp and CYP3A4 inducer, rifampicin, decreased exposure to nintedanib by 50%. Concomitant use of P-gp and CYP3A4 inducers (e.g., carbamazepine, phenytoin, and St. John’s wort) with OFEV should be avoided as these drugs may decrease exposure to nintedanib.
  • Anticoagulants: Nintedanib may increase the risk of bleeding. Monitor patients on full anticoagulation therapy closely for bleeding and adjust anticoagulation treatment as necessary.

USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

  • Nursing Mothers: Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in nursing infants from OFEV, advise women that breastfeeding is not recommended during treatment.
  • Reproductive Potential: OFEV may reduce fertility in females of reproductive potential.
  • Smokers: Smoking was associated with decreased exposure to OFEV, which may affect the efficacy of OFEV. Encourage patients to stop smoking prior to and during treatment.
CL-OF-100025 09.06.19

Click here for full Prescribing Information, including Patient Information.