Access Support

OFEV offers a range of services to help streamline the fulfillment process

iASSIST—AN ELECTRONIC PORTAL FOR SUBMITTING PRESCRIPTIONS THAT MAY HELP SAVE TIME OVER FAXED, PAPER-BASED SUBMISSIONS

May expedite the time spent creating an OFEV prescription
Automatically completes required patient insurance data to reduce submission errors
Automatically initiates prior authorization support
Allows for easy electronic enrollment in the OPEN DOORS® Patient Support Program by your patient or their caregiver

Follow the steps below to get started with iAssist today

1
Create an account at AssistRx.com
2
Set up users for the account, such as yourself and individuals from your staff
3
Go to the “Start Now” section of your dashboard
4
Search for “OFEV” and then follow the listed steps to submit electronic prescriptions
5
Access the OPEN DOORS® enrollment forms (optional)

Phone: 877-450-4412
Email:
helpdesk@AssistRx.com

Website: AssistRx.com

Locally based reimbursement and access specialists are available to assist with patient access

Their role may include:

  • Helping you manage the OFEV fulfillment process
  • Helping to educate staff on process or payer issues related to patient OFEV prescriptions
  • Contacting the specialty pharmacy or OFEV Bridge Program to help you navigate the OFEV process
  • Providing in-person, phone, or email assistance

Your OFEV Sales Consultant or Clinical Educator can put you in contact with your Reimbursement and Access Specialist

Need help with prior authorizations and treatment appeals?

Download the comprehensive set of tools designed to help you navigate the process

IPF Resources:

SSc-ILD Resources:

The OFEV Bridge Program can close the gap in access during prescription delays

The OFEV Bridge Program temporarily provides OFEV free of charge to eligible patients* experiencing a payer delay.† During the extended review period, the OFEV Bridge Program temporarily provides:

OFEV® (nintedanib) 15 day supply icon

A 15-day supply of OFEV, with up to 3 additional 15-day refills (60 days total)

|

OFEV patient starter kit icon

An OFEV Welcome Kit

*To be eligible, patients prescribed OFEV must be insured, meet certain income requirements, and experience a delay in receiving their therapy (treatment initiation or refills) due to a payer delay.

†Payer delay is defined as benefit verification taking 7 calendar days or longer to complete; or an outstanding payer approval of at least 7 calendar days or longer, or a payer denial of coverage that is under appeal; or no “in-network” OFEV-limited network specialty pharmacies for the patient’s payer and the “letter of agreement” that the specialty pharmacy needs to obtain on behalf of the patient has been pending for at least 7 calendar days; or reauthorization of an existing patient is taking 7 calendar days or longer; or an existing patient has changed insurance and the new payer approval is taking 7 calendar days or longer.


FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS ARE AVAILABLE TO HELP PATIENTS GAIN ACCESS TO OFEV

If your patients need help paying for OFEV, there are programs designed to help with out-of-pocket costs (such as copay or deductibles)


THE OFEV COMMERICAL COPAY PROGRAM

If your patients have commercial insurance, they may be eligible for the OFEV Commercial Copay Program. The Specialty Pharmacy will determine if your patients are eligible during the benefit verification process.


With the OFEV Commercial Copay Program:

  • Patients may receive OFEV for as little as $0 per month up to a monthly cap of $10,000, with an annual cap of $160,000
  • There is no card to carry or worry about. The program is managed by the Specialty Pharmacy. Eligibility is determined by the Specialty Pharmacy during the benefits verification process
  • Patients must be re-enrolled every 12 months. The Specialty Pharmacy will complete their enrollment and re-enrollment
  • Patients covered by any form of government paid insurance (Medicare, Medicaid, Tricare, etc.) are not eligible for this program. Also, those paying with cash will not be eligible

THIRD PARTY FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

If patients are enrolled in a government healthcare prescription drug program, do not have insurance, or have private insurance that does not cover OFEV, other financial assistance may be available through independent charities.

These independent charities typically require separate applications, have financial eligibility guidelines, and require financial documentation, such as copies of previous tax returns.

BOEHRINGER INGELHEIM CARES FOUNDATION PATIENT ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

For: Eligible patients who are uninsured or underinsured

The BI Cares Patient Assistance Program is a charitable program provided by the Boehringer Ingelheim Cares Foundation, an independent nonprofit organization. The program helps those in need obtain Boehringer Ingelheim medications including OFEV free of charge. Patients prescribed OFEV who apply must meet program eligibility requirements including income and prescription coverage criteria in order to be enrolled. The program requires a completed application form signed by patient and healthcare provider and supporting documentation.

Visit the BI Cares Website


IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION AND INDICATIONS

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

Hepatic Impairment: OFEV is not recommended in patients with moderate (Child Pugh B) or severe (Child Pugh C) hepatic impairment. Patients with mild hepatic impairment (Child Pugh A) can be treated with a reduced dosage (100 mg twice daily). Consider treatment interruption or discontinuation for management of adverse reactions.

Elevated Liver Enzymes and Drug-Induced Liver Injury

  • Cases of drug-induced liver injury (DILI) have been observed with OFEV treatment. In the clinical trials and post-marketing period, non-serious and serious cases of DILI were reported. Cases of severe liver injury with fatal outcome have been reported in the post-marketing period. The majority of hepatic events occur within the first three months of treatment. OFEV was associated with elevations of liver enzymes (ALT, AST, ALKP, and GGT) and bilirubin. Liver enzyme and bilirubin increases were reversible with dose modification or interruption in the majority of cases.
  • In IPF studies, the majority (94%) of patients with ALT and/or AST elevations had elevations less than 5 times ULN and the majority (95%) of patients with bilirubin elevations had elevations less than 2 times ULN.
  • In the SSc-ILD study, a maximum ALT and/or AST greater than or equal to 3 times ULN was observed in 4.9% of patients treated with OFEV.
  • Patients with low body weight (less than 65 kg), patients who are Asian, and female patients may have a higher risk of elevations in liver enzymes. Nintedanib exposure increased with patient age, which may result in increased liver enzymes.
  • Conduct liver function tests prior to initiation of treatment, at regular intervals during the first three months of treatment, and periodically thereafter or as clinically indicated. Measure liver function tests promptly in patients who report symptoms that may indicate liver injury, including fatigue, anorexia, right upper abdominal discomfort, dark urine, or jaundice. Dosage modifications, interruption, or discontinuation may be necessary for liver enzyme elevations.

Gastrointestinal Disorders

Diarrhea

  • In IPF studies, diarrhea was the most frequent gastrointestinal event reported in 62% versus 18% of patients treated with OFEV and placebo, respectively. Events were primarily mild to moderate in intensity and occurred within the first 3 months. Diarrhea led to permanent dose reduction in 11% and discontinuation in 5% of OFEV patients versus 0 and less than 1% in placebo patients, respectively.
  • In the SSc-ILD study, diarrhea was the most frequent gastrointestinal event reported in 76% versus 32% of patients treated with OFEV and placebo, respectively. Events were primarily mild to moderate in intensity and occurred within the first 3 months. Diarrhea led to permanent dose reduction in 22% and discontinuation in 7% of OFEV patients versus 1% and 0.3% in placebo patients, respectively.
  • Dosage modifications or treatment interruptions may be necessary in patients with diarrhea. Treat diarrhea at first signs with adequate hydration and antidiarrheal medication (e.g., loperamide), and consider treatment interruption if diarrhea continues. OFEV treatment may be resumed at the full dosage (150 mg twice daily), or at the reduced dosage (100 mg twice daily), which subsequently may be increased to the full dosage. If severe diarrhea persists, discontinue treatment.

Nausea and Vomiting

  • In IPF studies, nausea was reported in 24% versus 7% and vomiting was reported in 12% versus 3% of patients treated with OFEV and placebo, respectively. Events were primarily of mild to moderate intensity. Nausea and vomiting led to discontinuation of OFEV in 2% and 1% of patients, respectively.
  • In the SSc-ILD study, nausea was reported in 32% versus 14% and vomiting was reported in 25% versus 10% of patients treated with OFEV and placebo, respectively. Events were primarily of mild to moderate intensity. Nausea and vomiting led to discontinuation of OFEV in 2% and 1% of patients, respectively.
  • If nausea or vomiting persists despite appropriate supportive care including anti-emetic therapy, consider dose reduction or treatment interruption. OFEV treatment may be resumed at full dosage or at reduced dosage, which subsequently may be increased to full dosage. If severe nausea or vomiting does not resolve, discontinue treatment.

Embryofetal Toxicity: OFEV can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman and patients should be advised of the potential risk to a fetus. Women should be advised to avoid becoming pregnant while receiving OFEV and to use highly effective contraception during treatment and at least 3 months after the last dose of OFEV. As the impact of nintedanib on the effectiveness of hormonal contraception is unknown, advise women using hormonal contraceptives to add a barrier method. Verify pregnancy status prior to starting OFEV and during treatment as appropriate.

Arterial Thromboembolic Events:

  • In IPF studies, arterial thromboembolic events were reported in 2.5% of OFEV and 0.8% of placebo patients, respectively. Myocardial infarction was the most common arterial thromboembolic event, occurring in 1.5% of OFEV and 0.4% of placebo patients.
  • In the SSc-ILD study, arterial thromboembolic events were reported in 0.7% of patients in both the OFEV-treated and placebo-treated patients. There were 0 cases of myocardial infarction in OFEV-treated patients compared to 0.7% of placebo-treated patients.
  • Use caution when treating patients at higher cardiovascular risk, including known coronary artery disease. Consider treatment interruption in patients who develop signs or symptoms of acute myocardial ischemia.

Risk of Bleeding

  • OFEV may increase the risk of bleeding.
  • In IPF studies, bleeding events were reported in 10% of OFEV versus 7% of placebo patients. In the post-marketing period, non-serious and serious bleeding events, some of which were fatal, have been observed.
  • In the SSc-ILD study, bleeding events were reported in 11% of OFEV versus 8% of placebo patients.
  • Use OFEV in patients with known risk of bleeding only if the anticipated benefit outweighs the potential risk.

Gastrointestinal Perforation

  • OFEV may increase the risk of gastrointestinal perforation.
  • In IPF studies, gastrointestinal perforation was reported in 0.3% of OFEV versus in 0% of placebo patients.
  • In the SSc-ILD study, no cases of gastrointestinal perforation were reported in either OFEV or placebo-treated patients.
  • In the post-marketing period, cases of gastrointestinal perforations have been reported, some of which were fatal. Use caution when treating patients who have had recent abdominal surgery, have a previous history of diverticular disease, or who are receiving concomitant corticosteroids or NSAIDs. Discontinue therapy with OFEV in patients who develop gastrointestinal perforation. Only use OFEV in patients with known risk of gastrointestinal perforation if the anticipated benefit outweighs the potential risk.

ADVERSE REACTIONS

  • Adverse reactions reported in greater than or equal to 5% of OFEV patients, and more than placebo, included diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, skin ulcer, abdominal pain, liver enzyme elevation, weight decreased, fatigue, decreased appetite, headache, pyrexia, back pain, dizziness and hypertension.
  • In IPF studies, the most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in patients treated with OFEV, more than placebo, were bronchitis (1.2% vs. 0.8%) and myocardial infarction (1.5% vs. 0.4%). The most common adverse events leading to death in OFEV patients versus placebo were pneumonia (0.7% vs. 0.6%), lung neoplasm malignant (0.3% vs. 0%), and myocardial infarction (0.3% vs. 0.2%). In the predefined category of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) including MI, fatal events were reported in 0.6% of OFEV versus 1.8% in placebo patients.
  • In the SSc-ILD study, the most frequent serious adverse events reported in patients treated with OFEV, more than placebo, were interstitial lung disease (2.4% vs. 1.7%) and pneumonia (2.8% vs. 0.3%). Within 52 weeks, 5 patients treated with OFEV (1.7%) and 4 patients treated with placebo (1.4%) died. There was no pattern among adverse events leading to death in either treatment arm.

DRUG INTERACTIONS

  • P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and CYP3A4 Inhibitors and Inducers: Coadministration with oral doses of a P-gp and CYP3A4 inhibitor, ketoconazole, increased exposure to nintedanib by 60%. Concomitant use of potent P-gp and CYP3A4 inhibitors (e.g., erythromycin) with OFEV may increase exposure to nintedanib. In such cases, patients should be monitored closely for tolerability of OFEV. Management of adverse reactions may require interruption, dose reduction, or discontinuation of therapy with OFEV. Coadministration with oral doses of a P-gp and CYP3A4 inducer, rifampicin, decreased exposure to nintedanib by 50%. Concomitant use of P-gp and CYP3A4 inducers (e.g., carbamazepine, phenytoin, and St. John’s wort) with OFEV should be avoided as these drugs may decrease exposure to nintedanib.
  • Anticoagulants: Nintedanib may increase the risk of bleeding. Monitor patients on full anticoagulation therapy closely for bleeding and adjust anticoagulation treatment as necessary.

USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

  • Nursing Mothers: Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in nursing infants from OFEV, advise women that breastfeeding is not recommended during treatment.
  • Reproductive Potential: OFEV may reduce fertility in females of reproductive potential.
  • Smokers: Smoking was associated with decreased exposure to OFEV, which may affect the efficacy of OFEV. Encourage patients to stop smoking prior to and during treatment.
CL-OF-100025 09.06.19

Indications

OFEV is indicated for the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF).
OFEV is indicated to slow the rate of decline in pulmonary function in patients with systemic sclerosis-associated interstitial lung disease (SSc-ILD).

Click here for full Prescribing Information, including Patient Information.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION AND INDICATIONS

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

Hepatic Impairment: OFEV is not recommended in patients with moderate (Child Pugh B) or severe (Child Pugh C) hepatic impairment. Patients with mild hepatic impairment (Child Pugh A) can be treated with a reduced dosage (100 mg twice daily). Consider treatment interruption or discontinuation for management of adverse reactions.

Elevated Liver Enzymes and Drug-Induced Liver Injury

  • Cases of drug-induced liver injury (DILI) have been observed with OFEV treatment. In the clinical trials and post-marketing period, non-serious and serious cases of DILI were reported. Cases of severe liver injury with fatal outcome have been reported in the post-marketing period. The majority of hepatic events occur within the first three months of treatment. OFEV was associated with elevations of liver enzymes (ALT, AST, ALKP, and GGT) and bilirubin. Liver enzyme and bilirubin increases were reversible with dose modification or interruption in the majority of cases.
  • In IPF studies, the majority (94%) of patients with ALT and/or AST elevations had elevations less than 5 times ULN and the majority (95%) of patients with bilirubin elevations had elevations less than 2 times ULN.
  • In the SSc-ILD study, a maximum ALT and/or AST greater than or equal to 3 times ULN was observed in 4.9% of patients treated with OFEV.
  • Patients with low body weight (less than 65 kg), patients who are Asian, and female patients may have a higher risk of elevations in liver enzymes. Nintedanib exposure increased with patient age, which may result in increased liver enzymes.
  • Conduct liver function tests prior to initiation of treatment, at regular intervals during the first three months of treatment, and periodically thereafter or as clinically indicated. Measure liver function tests promptly in patients who report symptoms that may indicate liver injury, including fatigue, anorexia, right upper abdominal discomfort, dark urine, or jaundice. Dosage modifications, interruption, or discontinuation may be necessary for liver enzyme elevations.

Gastrointestinal Disorders

Diarrhea

  • In IPF studies, diarrhea was the most frequent gastrointestinal event reported in 62% versus 18% of patients treated with OFEV and placebo, respectively. Events were primarily mild to moderate in intensity and occurred within the first 3 months. Diarrhea led to permanent dose reduction in 11% and discontinuation in 5% of OFEV patients versus 0 and less than 1% in placebo patients, respectively.
  • In the SSc-ILD study, diarrhea was the most frequent gastrointestinal event reported in 76% versus 32% of patients treated with OFEV and placebo, respectively. Events were primarily mild to moderate in intensity and occurred within the first 3 months. Diarrhea led to permanent dose reduction in 22% and discontinuation in 7% of OFEV patients versus 1% and 0.3% in placebo patients, respectively.
  • Dosage modifications or treatment interruptions may be necessary in patients with diarrhea. Treat diarrhea at first signs with adequate hydration and antidiarrheal medication (e.g., loperamide), and consider treatment interruption if diarrhea continues. OFEV treatment may be resumed at the full dosage (150 mg twice daily), or at the reduced dosage (100 mg twice daily), which subsequently may be increased to the full dosage. If severe diarrhea persists, discontinue treatment.

Nausea and Vomiting

  • In IPF studies, nausea was reported in 24% versus 7% and vomiting was reported in 12% versus 3% of patients treated with OFEV and placebo, respectively. Events were primarily of mild to moderate intensity. Nausea and vomiting led to discontinuation of OFEV in 2% and 1% of patients, respectively.
  • In the SSc-ILD study, nausea was reported in 32% versus 14% and vomiting was reported in 25% versus 10% of patients treated with OFEV and placebo, respectively. Events were primarily of mild to moderate intensity. Nausea and vomiting led to discontinuation of OFEV in 2% and 1% of patients, respectively.
  • If nausea or vomiting persists despite appropriate supportive care including anti-emetic therapy, consider dose reduction or treatment interruption. OFEV treatment may be resumed at full dosage or at reduced dosage, which subsequently may be increased to full dosage. If severe nausea or vomiting does not resolve, discontinue treatment.

Embryofetal Toxicity: OFEV can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman and patients should be advised of the potential risk to a fetus. Women should be advised to avoid becoming pregnant while receiving OFEV and to use highly effective contraception during treatment and at least 3 months after the last dose of OFEV. As the impact of nintedanib on the effectiveness of hormonal contraception is unknown, advise women using hormonal contraceptives to add a barrier method. Verify pregnancy status prior to starting OFEV and during treatment as appropriate.

Arterial Thromboembolic Events:

  • In IPF studies, arterial thromboembolic events were reported in 2.5% of OFEV and 0.8% of placebo patients, respectively. Myocardial infarction was the most common arterial thromboembolic event, occurring in 1.5% of OFEV and 0.4% of placebo patients.
  • In the SSc-ILD study, arterial thromboembolic events were reported in 0.7% of patients in both the OFEV-treated and placebo-treated patients. There were 0 cases of myocardial infarction in OFEV-treated patients compared to 0.7% of placebo-treated patients.
  • Use caution when treating patients at higher cardiovascular risk, including known coronary artery disease. Consider treatment interruption in patients who develop signs or symptoms of acute myocardial ischemia.

Risk of Bleeding

  • OFEV may increase the risk of bleeding.
  • In IPF studies, bleeding events were reported in 10% of OFEV versus 7% of placebo patients. In the post-marketing period, non-serious and serious bleeding events, some of which were fatal, have been observed.
  • In the SSc-ILD study, bleeding events were reported in 11% of OFEV versus 8% of placebo patients.
  • Use OFEV in patients with known risk of bleeding only if the anticipated benefit outweighs the potential risk.

Gastrointestinal Perforation

  • OFEV may increase the risk of gastrointestinal perforation.
  • In IPF studies, gastrointestinal perforation was reported in 0.3% of OFEV versus in 0% of placebo patients.
  • In the SSc-ILD study, no cases of gastrointestinal perforation were reported in either OFEV or placebo-treated patients.
  • In the post-marketing period, cases of gastrointestinal perforations have been reported, some of which were fatal. Use caution when treating patients who have had recent abdominal surgery, have a previous history of diverticular disease, or who are receiving concomitant corticosteroids or NSAIDs. Discontinue therapy with OFEV in patients who develop gastrointestinal perforation. Only use OFEV in patients with known risk of gastrointestinal perforation if the anticipated benefit outweighs the potential risk.

ADVERSE REACTIONS

  • Adverse reactions reported in greater than or equal to 5% of OFEV patients, and more than placebo, included diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, skin ulcer, abdominal pain, liver enzyme elevation, weight decreased, fatigue, decreased appetite, headache, pyrexia, back pain, dizziness and hypertension.
  • In IPF studies, the most frequent serious adverse reactions reported in patients treated with OFEV, more than placebo, were bronchitis (1.2% vs. 0.8%) and myocardial infarction (1.5% vs. 0.4%). The most common adverse events leading to death in OFEV patients versus placebo were pneumonia (0.7% vs. 0.6%), lung neoplasm malignant (0.3% vs. 0%), and myocardial infarction (0.3% vs. 0.2%). In the predefined category of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) including MI, fatal events were reported in 0.6% of OFEV versus 1.8% in placebo patients.
  • In the SSc-ILD study, the most frequent serious adverse events reported in patients treated with OFEV, more than placebo, were interstitial lung disease (2.4% vs. 1.7%) and pneumonia (2.8% vs. 0.3%). Within 52 weeks, 5 patients treated with OFEV (1.7%) and 4 patients treated with placebo (1.4%) died. There was no pattern among adverse events leading to death in either treatment arm.

DRUG INTERACTIONS

  • P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and CYP3A4 Inhibitors and Inducers: Coadministration with oral doses of a P-gp and CYP3A4 inhibitor, ketoconazole, increased exposure to nintedanib by 60%. Concomitant use of potent P-gp and CYP3A4 inhibitors (e.g., erythromycin) with OFEV may increase exposure to nintedanib. In such cases, patients should be monitored closely for tolerability of OFEV. Management of adverse reactions may require interruption, dose reduction, or discontinuation of therapy with OFEV. Coadministration with oral doses of a P-gp and CYP3A4 inducer, rifampicin, decreased exposure to nintedanib by 50%. Concomitant use of P-gp and CYP3A4 inducers (e.g., carbamazepine, phenytoin, and St. John’s wort) with OFEV should be avoided as these drugs may decrease exposure to nintedanib.
  • Anticoagulants: Nintedanib may increase the risk of bleeding. Monitor patients on full anticoagulation therapy closely for bleeding and adjust anticoagulation treatment as necessary.

USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

  • Nursing Mothers: Because of the potential for serious adverse reactions in nursing infants from OFEV, advise women that breastfeeding is not recommended during treatment.
  • Reproductive Potential: OFEV may reduce fertility in females of reproductive potential.
  • Smokers: Smoking was associated with decreased exposure to OFEV, which may affect the efficacy of OFEV. Encourage patients to stop smoking prior to and during treatment.
CL-OF-100025 09.06.19

Indications

OFEV is indicated for the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF).
OFEV is indicated to slow the rate of decline in pulmonary function in patients with systemic sclerosis-associated interstitial lung disease (SSc-ILD).

Click here for full Prescribing Information, including Patient Information.